Jorge Adot

1979 while at Georgia State University’s campus radio station Bob Geldof read a telex report (similar to a fax) describing the shooting spree by Brenda Ann Spencer at Cleveland Elementary School. 

From Wikipedia

I was doing a radio interview in Atlanta with Fingers and there was a telex machine beside me. I read it as it came out. Not liking Mondays as a reason for doing somebody in, is a bit strange. I was thinking about it on the way back to the hotel, and I just said ‘Silicone (sic) chip inside her head had switched to overload’. I wrote that down. And the journalists interviewing her said, ‘Tell me why?’ It was such a senseless act. It was the perfect senseless act and this was the perfect senseless reason for doing it. So perhaps I wrote the perfect senseless song to illustrate it. It wasn’t an attempt to exploit tragedy.

This would become Saint Bob’s (as he would later be called due to his work on Live Aid) most famous song.

Look at this fucking Hipster. No, look at her. 
In 1979, at 16, Brenda Ann Spencer pulled out a 22 rifle (a gift from her father) and opened fire on the elementary school students leaving the school across from her home. She killed two and injured 9 others.
When asked why she committed the murders: ”I just did it for the fun of it. I don’t like Mondays. This livens up the day. I have to go now. I shot a pig [policeman] I think and I want to shoot more. I’m having too much fun [to surrender].”
It was this famous line, “I don’t like Mondays” which inspired the song of the same name by Bob Geldof and the Boom Town Rats.

Look at this fucking Hipster. No, look at her. 

In 1979, at 16, Brenda Ann Spencer pulled out a 22 rifle (a gift from her father) and opened fire on the elementary school students leaving the school across from her home. She killed two and injured 9 others.

When asked why she committed the murders: ”I just did it for the fun of it. I don’t like Mondays. This livens up the day. I have to go now. I shot a pig [policeman] I think and I want to shoot more. I’m having too much fun [to surrender].”

It was this famous line, “I don’t like Mondays” which inspired the song of the same name by Bob Geldof and the Boom Town Rats.

It is a small world. you do not have to live in it particularly long to learn that for yourself. There is a theory that, in the whole world, there are only five hundred real people (the cast, as it were; all the rest of the people in the world, the theory suggests, are extras) and what is more, they all know each other. And it’s true, or true as far as it goes. In reality the world is made of thousands upon thousands of groups of about five hundred people, all of whom will spend their lives bumping into each other, trying to avoid each other, and discovering each other in the same unlikely teashop in Vancouver. There is an unavoidability to this process. it’s not even coincidence. It’s just the way the world works, with no regard for individuals or for propriety.

Neil Gaiman  (via classicbrion)
By now everyone has seen Stephen Colbert’s opening statement during a hearing of the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship and Border Security. But the most interesting moment was what happened at the end. Judy Chu, US Representative for California asks: “Mr. Colbert, you could work on so many issues, why are you interested in this issue?”
There is a brief pause. Colbert nervously brushes his fingers through his hair, and in the background you can hear the flick, flick, flicker of the cameras going off until they become a steady tap like a storm. It is in this moment that we see Colbert the character become Colbert the person and he says: 
"I like talking about people who don’t have any power. And this seemed like one of the least powerful people in the United States are migrant workers who come and do our work but don’t have any rights as a result, and yet we still invite them to come here and at the same time ask them to leave and that’s an interesting contradiction to me. And you know, ‘what’s so ever you do for the least of my brothers.’ And these seemed like the least of our brothers—right now and lot of people are least brothers right now because the economy is so hard, and i don’t want to take any one’s hardship away from them or diminish anything like that, but migrant workers suffer and have no rights."
Relevant section of the video is at the two hour mark.

By now everyone has seen Stephen Colbert’s opening statement during a hearing of the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship and Border Security. But the most interesting moment was what happened at the end. Judy Chu, US Representative for California asks: “Mr. Colbert, you could work on so many issues, why are you interested in this issue?”

There is a brief pause. Colbert nervously brushes his fingers through his hair, and in the background you can hear the flick, flick, flicker of the cameras going off until they become a steady tap like a storm. It is in this moment that we see Colbert the character become Colbert the person and he says: 

"I like talking about people who don’t have any power. And this seemed like one of the least powerful people in the United States are migrant workers who come and do our work but don’t have any rights as a result, and yet we still invite them to come here and at the same time ask them to leave and that’s an interesting contradiction to me. And you know, ‘what’s so ever you do for the least of my brothers.’ And these seemed like the least of our brothers—right now and lot of people are least brothers right now because the economy is so hard, and i don’t want to take any one’s hardship away from them or diminish anything like that, but migrant workers suffer and have no rights."

Relevant section of the video is at the two hour mark.

And this, or one similar to it, would be the factory.
Scenes from China - The Big Picture - Boston.com

A worker walks out of a factory building outfitted with nets, installed to prevent workers from jumping to their deaths, at a Foxconn factory, in Langfang, Hebei Province August 3, 2010. There have been nearly a dozen suicides at Foxconn plants around China this year alone, prompting calls for investigations into poor working conditions at the plants that make parts for customers such as Apple, HP and Dell. (REUTERS/Jason Lee)

And this, or one similar to it, would be the factory.

Scenes from China - The Big Picture - Boston.com

A worker walks out of a factory building outfitted with nets, installed to prevent workers from jumping to their deaths, at a Foxconn factory, in Langfang, Hebei Province August 3, 2010. There have been nearly a dozen suicides at Foxconn plants around China this year alone, prompting calls for investigations into poor working conditions at the plants that make parts for customers such as Apple, HP and Dell. (REUTERS/Jason Lee)

Somehow I don’t think this is the first iPad in China since a factory in China has been making them for almost a year now.

Scenes from China - The Big Picture - Boston.com
Han Ziwen celebrates his purchase of the first Apple iPad tablet computer in China at the Apple store in Beijing on September 17, 2010 as Apple began selling iPads in China. (ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images)

Somehow I don’t think this is the first iPad in China since a factory in China has been making them for almost a year now.

Scenes from China - The Big Picture - Boston.com

Han Ziwen celebrates his purchase of the first Apple iPad tablet computer in China at the Apple store in Beijing on September 17, 2010 as Apple began selling iPads in China. (ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images)

elpasajero:

 
Description
A circulated $1 bill with “In God We Trust” marked out with a custom-made stamp.
Source
Amateur Photograph.
Date
c. 1995
Author
DrkBlueXG

elpasajero:

 

Description

A circulated $1 bill with “In God We Trust” marked out with a custom-made stamp.

Source

Amateur Photograph.

Date

c. 1995

Author

DrkBlueXG